Located: in the northern part of Laos (Northern Provinces)
Total area: 16,270 square kilometers
Population: 178,000
07 Districts: Phongsaly, May, Khua, Samphanh, Boun Neua, Boun Tai & Gnot-Ou
Capital of the province: Phongsaly

Farthest north in Laos is Phongsaly, which shares borders with Yunnan (China) and Dien Bien (Vietnam). Most of Phongsaly Province lies at a high altitude. Its capital, Phongsaly town, is the highest city in Laos PDR at 1,400 meters above sea level. Up there the climate is pleasant and refreshing covering the endless mountains down to the canyon of the Nam Ou River, biggest tributary of the Mekong. The population is made up of officially 28 different ethnic groups, of which the majority being Khmu, Phounoy, different Akha, Tai Lue and Hor, each with their own culture, traditions, costumes, and languages. The forests contain an abundance of animal, bird, insect and plant life, and there are certainly many undiscovered species, new to science. Several trekking tours have been established by the Provincial Tourism Office Phongsaly.

Most visitors of Phongsaly Province get a feeling of “no longer being in Laos, not yet having reached China”. History tells fascinating stories, though much of it still lies in darkness. Between China and Laos the territory of north-western Phongsaly and southern Yunnan once was the independent Tai Lue kingdom of Sipsongpanna. In 1895 the French colonialists drew new boundaries along the watersheds of the Nam Ou river, claiming Sipsongpanna’s eastern part to Phongsaly incorporating it into French Indochina. Its bigger part went into Yunnan Province, China.

Unlike many other cities in Laos, Phongsaly Town has not been destroyed in the American war. It features a remaining old quarter with Yunnanese wooden architecture, now rare to find in Yunnan itself. Most of the people living here belong to the Hor ethnic group, speaking Chinese. Until the 1970s there had been a Chinese consulate in Phongsaly Town, which is now the “Phou Fa Hotel”. In the “Museum of Ethnic Groups in Phongsaly Province” you can admire the various local textiles, artifacts and handicrafts. The town itself is surrounded by rolling hills and is built into the side of Phou Fa Mountain (1,625 meters). The 45 minute hike up to its stupa on top offers spectacular views of the town from above and the mountains in the far distance.

Although a bit off the main tourist circuit, visitors can spend plenty of time in Phongsaly Province trekking to remote villages around the province, Boun Neua, Muang Khua at the Nam Ou River and in Boun Tai District’s “Nam Lan Conservation Area”. In the northern most district of the country, Gnot Ou, visit Wat Luang, a magnificent Tai Lue style Buddhist monastery dating back to 1445 AD. In the future “Phou Den Din National Protected Area” along the border with Vietnam will be opened for boat trips. Wild animals like monkeys, elephants and tigers still claim it their territory!

The province offers a delicious variety of Lao and Yunnanese cuisine that consists of wild forest ingredients such as fragrant herbs, bamboo and rattan shoots. After dinner try a shot of the local Lao Lao, smooth, strong and tinted green! During the final stage of the distillation process this rice whisky is running over fresh picked raspberry leaves absorbing the green color.

The Chinese-style green tea of Phongsaly receives worldwide recognition for its high quality and superb taste. Tea leaves are picked by the Phounoy minority women from tea trees up to 400 years old tea, standing 6 meters high with a stem up to 30 centimetres in diameter. These precious tea leaves are compressed in bamboo cylinders and sold in cigar-shaped tubes. In this wild tea grove fertilizers and chemicals have never been used. Drinking a daily cup keeps the body in good health, reduces fat and preserves a clear mind.

Images

Phongsaly province photoPhoto by Prince Roy Phongsaly province photoPhoto by Prince Roy Phongsaly province photoPhoto by Prince Roy Phongsaly province photoPhoto by Prince Roy

 

Map Location

Our Hotel Pick Near the Phongsaly Province

Viphaphone Hotel

Rating: 7.8/10

Viphaphone Hotel offers accommodations in Phôngsali.

Rooms feature a fan, an electric kettle and a private room with a shower. Free toiletries are provided. Some rooms have a seating area and a TV for your convenience.

 

From Wikipedia

Phôngsali (Lao ຜົ້ງສາລີ) is a province of Laos, located in the extreme north of the country. The capital of the province is the city of Phôngsali. Phôngsali is located between Yunnan (China), and Điện Biên Province in Vietnam. Its culture has thus been historically heavily influenced by China.

Phongsali Province covers an area of 16,270 square kilometres (6,280 sq mi), out of which 77% has forest cover. The province borders China to the north and west, Vietnam to the east, Luang Prabang Province to the south, and Oudomxai Province to the southwest. The highest mountain in the province is Phou Doychy with an elevation of 1,842 metres (6,043 ft) Protected areas in the province include the Phou Dene Din National Biodiversity Conservation Area and Nam Lan Conservation Area. Agriculture is the mainstay of the people of the province. Phôngsali is the primary trade gateway between Laos and China, exporting lumber and importing several types of finished goods.

History
The Phu Noi left Muang Sing or Burma and arrived in Phongsaly at the end of the 18th century.The Hmong settled in Phongsaly at the end of the 19th century, having migrated from southern China. In 1895, a Sino-French treaty transferred the Tai Lue’s Sip Song Phan Na principalities of Phongsaly and Muang Sing to French Laos. Between 1908 and 1910, the Tai Lue conducted a revolt against colonial authority. When it ended, the colonial military assumed full authority in Phongsaly.In 1936, Sithon Kommadam and his brother, Kamphanh were jailed in Phongsaly because of their participation in their father’s (Ong Kommandam) 1934–1936 armed revolt against the French. After Sithon’s release in 1945, he established resistance bases in Phongsaly, soon making contact with the Viet Minh.The Communists came into power in 1954 in the province; within six years, the Phunoy began experiencing Buddhist religious purges.Subsequent to the 1954 Geneva Accords, Communist Pathet Lao forces in Phongsaly province were provided with regrouping zones. Phongsaly was integrated into the Royal Lao Government on December 18, 1957.

Geography
Phongsali Province covers an area of 16,270 square kilometres (6,280 sq mi), out of which 77% has forest cover. The province borders China to the north and west, Vietnam to the east, Luang Prabang Province to the south, and Oudomxai Province to the southwest. It is located high in the mountains, approximately 450–1,800 metres (1,480–5,910 ft) above sea level. The highest mountain in the province is Phou Doychy with an elevation of 1,842 metres (6,043 ft).The Phou Fa hill, at 1,625 metres (5,331 ft), is near the capital city and has road access to the top from where vistas of the city are viewable. The top of the mountain is also approached by 431 steps. Because of economic commerce with China, large portions of the province have been deforested.

Phongsali is characterized by a relatively cool climate. Weather in the province is described as “four seasons in a single day” with cold mornings and evenings, humidity during the day, and rains in the afternoon, which has created lush green forests.

Protected areas
Large areas of the province’s forests in Phou Den Din NBCA have plentiful wildlife but no human habitation.

The 126,880 hectare Phou Dendin Important Bird Area (IBA) is located within the 222,000 hectare Phou Den Din NBCA. The IBA altitude varies between 500–1,900 metres (1,600–6,200 ft) above sea level. Topographical elements include the Nam Ou River and its catchment, the area at the confluence of the Nam Khang River, mountainous terrain, and slopes. The habitat is characterized by unbroken dry evergreen forest and inland wetlands. Notable avifauna includes Blyth’s kingfisher (Alcedo hercules), brown dipper (Cinclus pallasii), brown hornbill (Anorrhinus tickelli), crested kingfisher (Megaceryle lugubris), great hornbill (Buceros bicornis), lesser fish eagle (Ichthyophaga humilis), and rufous-necked hornbill (Aceros nipalensis).

Demographics
The population of the province is 165,926 as of the March 2005 census. There are 13 minority ethnic groups with independent language and culture identity: Khammu, Thai Dam, Thai Daeng, Yao, Leu, Hor, Hmong, Akha, Yang, Bid, Lolo and others. Each group has its own practices in respect to marriage customs as well as specific handicrafts, silverware and jewelry.

Languages
Other than the national language Lao, various minority languages are spoken in Phongsaly province, most of which belong to the Tai (Tai-Kadai), Hanoish (Tibeto-Burman), and Khmuic (Austroasiatic) branches. The table below lists the languages surveyed in Kingsada (1999), Shintani (2001), and Kato (2008), with autonyms and informant birth places given as well. All languages are spoken in Phongsaly province unless indicated otherwise.

Economy
Agriculture is the mainstay of the people of the province. Phôngsali is the primary trade gateway between Laos and China, exporting lumber and importing several types of finished goods. There are also several Chinese manufacturing companies in the province, along with other foreign investment.

As an economic activity 24 villages have been identified to install mini hydro-power projects with pico-turbines to provide electric supply utilizing the hydro power potential of the hilly areas which have good monsoon rainfall. Local material will be used for construction of civil works and villagers trained to plan, implement and operate the units including maintenance of all components of the project covering transmission lines also. The objective is to reduce poverty among the rural poor of the remote villages. The project is proposed for implementation at a cost of Euro 210,000 with 48% financing by the Energy and Environment Partnership (EEP)of Mekong with Electriciens Sand Frontieres as lead partner. The project is slated for implementation over a 20 months period.

In order to reduce the addiction to opium, the United Nations Organization on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) introduced the Phongsaly Alternative Development Fund Project for Opium Elimination covering 30 villages in Khoua and Mai districts, and also minimise opium addiction in 60 villages in Samphan district, through alternative development activities. During the final years of the 20th century, 3,872 ha of the province had opium poppy cultivation (20% of the national total production) with 513 villages out of 611 growing opium with an addiction rate of 5.6%. In spite of government ban on opium poppy cultivation, Phongsaly has the maximum number of districts below the poverty line, and is one of the major opium producing provinces in the country.

Landmarks
Important landmarks in the province are the Wat Ou-Tai Temple, the Wat Luang Ou-Neua Temple and the That Phou Xay Stupa.

The Wat Ou-Tai Temple is in the Ban Ou- Tai village. It was built by Praya Chakkawattiraja and is said to be 500 years old. The Hor Thane Keo, inside the monastery, is a specific sanctum where Buddha images are deified. This sanctum is built with mud and has many types of decorations retained in its original form. The wooden columns of the shrine are supported over on stone blocks; these also have been elegantly designed and painted with drawings of daggers, swords, flowers and flags, and all carved in wood. There is a shrine built in brick masonry within the monastery complex which is called “ Ou Bo Sot” (meaning a place where monks meet and conduct religious rites) by the Tai Lue ethnic groups.

Wat Luang Ou-Neua Temple is also an old and highly revered temple built about 500 years ago in Ban Ou Neua village. The temple has a double overlapping roof in the Lue architecture style and is very impressive. The temple is adorned with traditional fine art techniques and houses A large Buddha image and small Buddha statues are deified inside this temple.

That Phou Xay Stupa is at the top of a hill, approached by walking up 400 steps.

Source: Wikipedia and Laos Tourism

Featured Photo by Prince Roy